Monday

A Hot & Humid June Afternoon!



It was a hot and humid July 
afternoon last Summer, when 
I decided to visit my girl friend, 
Susie who was a recent UNC grad. 

Beautiful and resourceful, Susie
had decided to repaint her kitchen 

herself instead of hiring a professional. 
I thought she might appreciate 
a break and brought over some iced
tea and some sandwiches.

When I arrived, I found Susie 

working hard, painting the kitchen 
walls. 

To my utter amazement, instead of
wearing old clothes, she was wearing 

her fur coat and her ski parka. 

I asked her why she was dressed that
way on such a hot day. She brought me 

the paint bucket and told me to read 
the instructions. I did. There was the 
explanation for me in black and white.
It said..."For best results, put on two coats."



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4 comments:

Professor Howdy said...

It was a hot and humid August afternoon, when I
decided to visit my girl friend, Susie who was a
recent UNC grad. Beautiful and resourceful, Susie
had decided to repaint her kitchen herself instead
of hiring a professional. I thought she might
appreciate a break and brought over some iced
tea and some sandwiches.

When I arrived, I found Susie working hard, painting
the kitchen walls. To my utter amazement, instead of
wearing old clothes, she was wearing her fur coat and
her ski parka. I asked her why she was dressed that
way on such a hot day. She brought me the paint
bucket and told me to read the instructions. I did.
There was the explanation for me in black and white.
It said..."For best results, put on two coats."


O.K. To Pass On To Friends/Family/Fellow
Workers/Fellow Students/Fellow
Faculty


No trees were killed in the posting of this message.
However a large number of electrons were terribly
inconvenienced...


*Click on the tiny white envelope -
with an arrow pointing to the right -
just below any thought, humor, or
cartoon on the main page of this
award winning blog...

Thanks/Grazias/Dank/Merci/Danke/Grazie,
Prof. Howdy

Professor Howdy said...

*Bear with each other and forgive whatever grievances you may
have against one another. Forgive as the Lord forgave you.
--Colossians 3

Ravi Zacharias - RZIM said...

Several years ago when a well-known actress made her plea for funding and
awareness of a particular disease, congressional committee chambers were
packed to capacity and surrounded by cameras. A stark contrast was seen
when an unknown woman suffering with Parkinson’s disease made her
appearance: hers was a reception of chairs left empty by legislators.

Remarked a congressman on ABC’s 20/20: “If you have the politically correct
disease, the prospects of getting federal funding to help find the cure are
100 times greater than if you have some other disease, even though it may
be a much more common disease.”

The irrationality of this goes beyond disease, does it not. By granting
the celebrity such esteem we seem unable to distinguish between a glamorous
skill we admire and the entirety of the person, as though artistry empowers
one to be a guru for all matters. Whether one is an actor or an athlete,
we are imperiled if we forget that giftedness says absolutely nothing about
a person’s integrity or wisdom.

We are now, by design, a culture steeped in manufacturing icons. Some time
ago one such person, whose only act on stage was to turn the words of an
alphabet and look happy while doing so, wrote her autobiography. The
demand was so great that it went into a second printing very quickly. One
major news anchorman marveled and wondered what prompted such fawning by
the masses for a skill as childish as that. He said it was an indictment
against their own profession--that it did not take much to be a hero.

Transference of authority is a scary phenomenon in our time. Being a great
entertainer is just that—a great entertainer. Let us not transfer
greatness across from one point to another without scrutinizing the
reasoning behind the recognizable face. Our judgements are in danger if
our heroes are influential only because they are well known. Jesus’ words
are striking: “Judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous
judgment.” He also goes on to say that we look at the outward, but God
looks at the heart.

Let us not miss the responsibility of judging an idea by the test of truth
and wisdom by foolishly being seduced at the altar of the popular. Life,
dear friend is more than glamour and substance is more than image.

Jackson R. - U.T. said...

Early in the Civil War, when the Union armies were suffering
repeated defeats, Abraham Lincoln was discussing the war
situation with his cabinet.

"How many men do you estimate are in the Confederate army?"
a cabinet member asked.

"About a million and a half," said Lincoln.

"That many?" said another member. "I thought the number was
considerably less."

"So did I," said Lincoln, "but every time one of our generals
lose a battle, he insists that he was outnumbered three to
one - and we have about 500,000 men."

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